Ultra-Low Sulfur Heating Oil Mandate

low sulfurLYNDONVILLE – In July, Vermont made a switch to which heating oil could be used to heat homes and buildings. It is now mandatory that all heating oil companies carry and deliver ultra-low sulfur heating oil.

A state-wide mandate in 2011 created a two-part step down to producing the cleanest-burning heating oil possible. The step down was made to reduce the presence of sulfur to be refined by 2018.

"In 2014, the sulfur content in the fuel was five-hundred parts per million. Four years later in 2018, the cleanest burning oil to date contains only fifteen parts per million of sulfur" according to Vermont Fuel Dealers Association Executive Director Matt Cota. 

With this ultra-low sulfur heating oil, all particulate matter is removed from the combustion of the fuel. This is significant because a clear majority of Vermonters burn heating oil in their homes and businesses.

Cota, states "In Vermont, we burn one hundred million gallons of heating oil per year to keep about half the homes and businesses warm." This ultra-low sulfur fuel is better for the air and environment by emitting less particulate matter.

This is not the only upside Cota stresses; the new type of oil is also a lot better and cleaner for furnaces and boilers. Proper protocol for furnace maintenance is a cleaning every two years. With the ultra-low sulfur oil, studies have found that there is much less soot and build up.

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